Your First Thai Massage

Your First Thai Massage

Is this your first Thai Yoga Massage? Here is a simple guide of what to expect during and after your session:

New Client Forms

Before Your Massage

  1. Thai Massage takes place fully clothed, without oils on a mat on the floor. This type of bodywork incorporates stretches, yoga postures and deep breath awareness.
  2. You will want to come to your massage with an empty stomach.
  3. Thai Massage works the entire body, from the crown of the head to the soles of the feet. Belly, face, feet and hands as well as the limbs and torso are all attended to.
  4. Thai Yoga Massage is a meditative practice. Both the giver and receiver engage in a state of relaxed focused awareness. It is best performed without conversation. The need to express may come up and that’s ok, however, the practitioner will not respond overly much.
  5. One of the most difficult things to do during a massage is to let go. To let your therapist move your body, essentially do all the work. This surrender is imperative to Thai massage. It creates neuromuscular confusion, rewiring the brain to establish new neural patterns of movement.

After Your Massage

  1. It is normal to feel a little sore the next day. Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Drink lots of warm water/ jasmine tea to help flush toxins and help nourish the tissues of the body.
  2. You may experience improved range of motion and flexibility.
  3. You may experience relief from pain and/or injury recovery.
  4. You may experience some changes in your energy. Generally an overall boost in vitality, however, if you feel very tired please honor that. Your body may be telling you something.

Please tell your therapist of any current or recent conditions you may be nurturing.

 

May You be Love

 

May You be Light

 

May You be Peace

 

 

 

 

 

On suffering

On suffering

“Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. I was better after I had cried, than before–more sorry, more aware of my own ingratitude, more gentle.”
Charles Dickens

Ahh pain. Suffering. What is it? How do the two differ? How are they the same? Today I injured myself giving a Thai Massage. Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. Pain and suffering are not the same things. Pain is a physical sensation; suffering is how we choose to experience it.

Bhikkhu Bodhi wrote,

The Buddha compares being afflicted with bodily pain to being struck by an arrow. Adding mental pain (aversion, displeasure, depression, or self-pity) to physical pain is like being hit by a second arrow. The wise person stops with the first arrow.”

“Same same but different” echoes the ethereal voice of my Thai yoga teacher in my mind. Slowly, slowly. Arms straight, back straight. “I did this massaging someone” the thought invades my mind, carrying with it grief and disbelief. I know exactly what I did. Lift, twist – from the core. Bandhas engaged, breath mindful. Intuition at the beginning of the massage telling me to go easy. And yet – in that last moment – I felt it clearly. I gently let go.
Knowing and Honoring my body, I saved myself from more serious injury. I’m certain of that. I’m also certain and grateful for my yoga practice which created this inner wisdom.

Five lessons I’ve learned from pain

  • let go
  • breathe
  • be where you are, no escaping
  • suffering is optional
  • there are many things to be grateful for

We learn the most powerful lessons during our times of greatest suffering.

Metta Bhav

Metta Bhav

“Let your love be like the misty rains, coming softly but flooding the river.” Malagasy ProverbRooted in rich tradition, the practices of Yoga and Thai Massage blend together to create a beautifully integrated approach to well being. Practiced in a state of loving kindness these healing modalities offer space for the individual to connect with their inner world.

In Jivamukti Yoga, the method’s founders Sharon Gannon and David Life write, “Bhav is a Sanskrit term used to describe the mood of one who is in love with God. This mood allows the practitioner access to deeper levels of the inner world of the soul.”

Metta (Pali) मेत्ता is a benevolence toward all beings, without discrimination, that is free of attachment. Metta is a strong, sincere wish for the happiness of all beings. The Metta Sutta compares metta to the love of a mother.

Metta Bhav is to be in the state of loving kindness and to see the light in all beings.

This is the art of Yoga. This is the heart of my practice.

Lokah Samastah Sukinoh Bhavantu ~ May all beings everywhere be happy and free.

Namaste,

Jeanette

Lessons learned in paradise

Lessons learned in paradise

After a long weekend in the Berkshires at the Triple Gem School of Thai Massage, I once again walk away incredibly humbled, loved and transformed. A few of the big lessons:

da13f-buddha

1. Trust. Oh yes!!! Hand to hand acro yoga. I was about to give up and my partner said to me “Oh no you can do this! I’ve got you.” What an amazing sentiment. Kadri, thank you!!
2. Non sensual loving touch in community that is so safe and supportive.
3. You can heal anything.
4. The mind is like a ping pong ball in meditation. The harder you throw it (try to focus it) the harder it bounces back.
5. Metta meditation – deepening the practice
6. That the more I know the more I know that I don’t know.

 

Om Shanti, Om Peace, Om Tat Sat

Jeanette

Lessons learned in the Shire

Lessons learned in the Shire

After a long weekend in the Berkshires at the Triple Gem School of Thai Massage, I once again walk away incredibly humbled, loved and transformed. A few of the big lessons:

da13f-buddha

1. Trust. Oh yes!!! Hand to hand acro yoga. I was about to give up and my partner said to me “Oh no you can do this! I’ve got you.” What an amazing sentiment. Kadri, thank you!!
2. Non sensual loving touch in community that is so safe and supportive.
3. You can heal anything.
4. The mind is like a ping pong ball in meditation. The harder you throw it (try to focus it) the harder it bounces back.
5. Metta meditation – deepening the practice
6. That the more I know the more I know that I don’t know.

 

Om Shanti, Om Peace, Om Tat Sat

Jeanette