The Triple Gem

The Triple Gem

The Triple Gem –

The Three Jewels, also called the Three Treasures, Three Refuges, Precious Triad, or most commonly the Triple Gem Pali: त्रिरत्न, are the three things that Buddhists take refuge in, and look toward for guidance, in the process known as taking refuge. The Three Jewels are: ⁕Buddha ⁕Dharma ⁕Sangha (Wikipedia)

I take Refuge in Buddha – the enlightened state

I take refuge in Dharma – the teachings

I take refuge in Sangha – the community

On suffering

On suffering

“Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. I was better after I had cried, than before–more sorry, more aware of my own ingratitude, more gentle.”
Charles Dickens

Ahh pain. Suffering. What is it? How do the two differ? How are they the same? Today I injured myself giving a Thai Massage. Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional. Pain and suffering are not the same things. Pain is a physical sensation; suffering is how we choose to experience it.

Bhikkhu Bodhi wrote,

The Buddha compares being afflicted with bodily pain to being struck by an arrow. Adding mental pain (aversion, displeasure, depression, or self-pity) to physical pain is like being hit by a second arrow. The wise person stops with the first arrow.”

“Same same but different” echoes the ethereal voice of my Thai yoga teacher in my mind. Slowly, slowly. Arms straight, back straight. “I did this massaging someone” the thought invades my mind, carrying with it grief and disbelief. I know exactly what I did. Lift, twist – from the core. Bandhas engaged, breath mindful. Intuition at the beginning of the massage telling me to go easy. And yet – in that last moment – I felt it clearly. I gently let go.
Knowing and Honoring my body, I saved myself from more serious injury. I’m certain of that. I’m also certain and grateful for my yoga practice which created this inner wisdom.

Five lessons I’ve learned from pain

  • let go
  • breathe
  • be where you are, no escaping
  • suffering is optional
  • there are many things to be grateful for

We learn the most powerful lessons during our times of greatest suffering.

Morning Meditation

Morning Meditation

“At the moment of waking up,
before getting out of bed,
get in touch with your breath,
feel the various sensations in your body, note any thoughts and feeling that maybe present, let mindfulness touch this moment,
Can you feel your breath?
Can you perceive the dawning of each in breath?
Can you enjoy the feeling of the breath freely entering your body in this moment?
“Breathe in I smile,
breathe out I calm my body,
dwelling in the present moment,
it is a wonderful moment.”

Thich Nhat Hanh

Losing My Mom - Losing Myself

The breeze at dawn has secrets to tell you.
Don’t go back to sleep.

You must ask for what you really want.
Don’t go back to sleep.

People are going back and forth across the doorsill where the two worlds touch.

The door is round and open.
Don’t go back to sleep.

Rumi

Loving Kindness Meditation

Loving Kindness Meditation

Metta Bhavana is a Buddhist meditation which cultivates benevolence toward oneself and others. It is a beautiful offering of loving kindness to the world.

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May you be safe and protected.
May you be contented and pleased.
May your body be strong and support you.
May your life unfold with Grace and ease.
Larissa Carlson

Begin by taking a comfortable seat. Allow your awareness to settle on your breath. Relax your shoulders, your mouth, your jaw. Soften your gaze and relax your eyes. Relax your head, your brain, the crown of your head. Let go of any thoughts and just feel a deep abiding sense of love. Imagine yourself as a child. Meet your child self in a place you feel safe. Feel your heart fill up with love for yourself. Let it get so full it overflows. Say to yourself “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.” Spend some time here with your self.

Next, call to mind the image of someone you love. The first person that comes to mind is the right one. Visualize them clearly in your mind’s eye. Feel your heart fill with love for them. Extend that love and a sincere desire for their well being toward them. Say silently to them “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.”

Next call to mind the image of someone who you are neutral toward. No strong feelings of like or dislike. Extend a feeling of loving kindness and a sincere desire for their well being toward this person. Say silently to them “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.”

Finally, call to mind the image of someone whom you have hostility toward. Extend to them a sincere desire for their well being. Feel your heart soften and embrace a sense of loving kindness for this person. Say to them silently “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.”

You may want to seal this practice with the sound of Om. Draw your hands together at your heart and feel the warmth of the love you’ve cultivated.

The more you nurture a feeling of loving kindness, the happier and calmer you will be.
Dalai Lama

Loving Kindness Meditation

Loving Kindness Meditation

Metta Bhavana is a Buddhist meditation which cultivates benevolence toward oneself and others. It is a beautiful offering of loving kindness to the world.

20130610-132020.jpg

May you be safe and protected.
May you be contented and pleased.
May your body be strong and support you.
May your life unfold with Grace and ease.
Larissa Carlson

Begin by taking a comfortable seat. Allow your awareness to settle on your breath. Relax your shoulders, your mouth, your jaw. Soften your gaze and relax your eyes. Relax your head, your brain, the crown of your head. Let go of any thoughts and just feel a deep abiding sense of love. Imagine yourself as a child. Meet your child self in a place you feel safe. Feel your heart fill up with love for yourself. Let it get so full it overflows. Say to yourself “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.” Spend some time here with your self.

Next, call to mind the image of someone you love. The first person that comes to mind is the right one. Visualize them clearly in your mind’s eye. Feel your heart fill with love for them. Extend that love and a sincere desire for their well being toward them. Say silently to them “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.”

Next call to mind the image of someone who you are neutral toward. No strong feelings of like or dislike. Extend a feeling of loving kindness and a sincere desire for their well being toward this person. Say silently to them “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.”

Finally, call to mind the image of someone whom you have hostility toward. Extend to them a sincere desire for their well being. Feel your heart soften and embrace a sense of loving kindness for this person. Say to them silently “May you be happy. May you be free from suffering.”

You may want to seal this practice with the sound of Om. Draw your hands together at your heart and feel the warmth of the love you’ve cultivated.

The more you nurture a feeling of loving kindness, the happier and calmer you will be.
Dalai Lama